In Visible Ink has a bold and courageous vision centred on restoring visibility to stories of people and histories marginalised by race and religion, and making the invisible, visible.

We believe that untold stories deserve to be heard and recognised, regardless of the time in which they unfold.

History should be a collection of many voices and opinions to accurately depict a moment in time from all angles.  Through In Visible Ink, we can contribute to correcting the bias representation of minorities in our history, highlighting the parts of the system we need to change and providing a platform to voice alternative views.

Our aim is to call out biases and make sure more than one perspective can challenge the accepted narrative. We need your help to build our story, from the grassroots up, and with expertise across disciplines: from artists and writers, filmmakers, academics, lawyers and most importantly, you. We use tools that everyone can access, bright pink, green and yellow highlighters and post it notes to annotate bias sources and draw attention to what’s being made invisible.

Our brand toolkit is intended as a community resources to visually shine a light on these stories, making this vision a reality.

HOW TO BECOME AN IN VISIBLE INK CURATOR

Use highlighters and post-it notes to tell a story or identify and shine a spotlight on untold stories of race and prejudice, negative and positive. We want to encourage conversations about the impact of these stories, on individuals and communities.  To explore how they can play a role in reducing systemic discrimination in our society.

If you have a story about an experience of racial invisibility or visibility, or come across a piece of material, no matter what it is, a news article, a quote, a statistic, an advertisement, a piece of legislation, a photograph that has more of a story to tell, we want to see it.

Write it down, take a photo, scan or photocopy the piece, mark it up with a pen or post it and describe with a short statement, the significance of the text.  Or send it to us and we will annotate it for you.

Email your work to us at s.hughes@mftwa.org.au, direct message or share it on instagram tagging @in_visible_ink and with the hashtag #invisibleink, and make sure you credit your sources.

We will repost it with your credit as an In Visible Ink curator, or anonymously, based on your preference.

Communities are at the heart of our brand. And just like the people who live in our communities, our brand changes and grows with them. Built from human annotations and a collection of bright colours and textures, our visuals aim to symbolise the act of individuals coming together to not only review the past, but also uncover and celebrate justice along the way.

To help tell the truth, heal and reconcile.

 

“Of the 14 Aboriginal figures in the painting, only one that isn’t wearing a traditional necklace is the man shaking Robinson’s hand as leader of the group. Another Indigenous man is holding out his necklace as if to remind his leader of what is at stake. I think Duterrau is using the necklaces as a symbol of Aboriginal culture and sovereignty, and the man holding out the necklace is reminding us of what is at stake.

At this point the war had already decimated the Aboriginal population in Tasmania from perhaps 6,000 to just a few hundred in the space of about 20 years, and now here is a massively significant transaction taking place – they are surrendering and accepting Robinson’s assurances.”

“What we are looking to generate is an irresistible tide of visual literacy that can help sweep Australia forward in terms of this country’s ability to look at its past with eyes wide open – rather than shielded from the uncomfortable glare of the injustice and terror inflicted on Aboriginal Australians, that still today stops many people from looking back.”  Dr Greg Lehman, University of Melbourne.

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO DOWNLOAD YOUR COPY OF THE TOOLKIT

VIEW THE MATERIALS FROM OUR FIRST IN VISIBLE INK ‘HACK’ AT THE STATE LIBRARY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

“Archives are unstable and we can destabilise them in a liberatory context.”

We were delighted to host our first In Visible Ink ‘hack’ at the State Library of Western Australia on 24 March, designed to shine a spotlight on and make visible the untold stories of race and prejudice (negative and positive) in the James Sykes Battye Library.

The workshop is part of a wider project to empower our curators and supporters with the tools to critically engage with and search our archives to uncover the stories within, and question the narratives presented to us by state institutions like our galleries, libraries, archives and museums.

Much appreciation to Battye Library Creative Fellows Gabby Loo and Steven Finch, and Research Fellow Ethan Blue; to the staff at the State Library for supporting this initiative, and to all those who joined us.

Click on the image below for the full presentation.

Here are some photos from the event.

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO WATCH OUR IN VISIBLE INK LAUNCH VIDEO